2015 Uganda Annual Learning Assessment Report Published

16 December, 2016, Kampala: In its sixth year of assessing children’s basic literacy and numeracy skills, Uwezo continues to find that children are not learning as they should be.

Nationally, 3 out of 10 pupils in P3-P7 can do Class 3 work.

English:

  • In P3, almost 2 out of 10 P3 children can read and understand a P2 English story, but 4 out of 10 cannot read an English word.
  • In P7, 2 out of 10 children cannot read a P2 English story.

Local Languages

  • In P3, almost 2 out of 10 P3 children can read a P2 level local language story but 4 out of 10 children in the same class cannot read a word in their local language.
  • In P7, 3 out of 10 children cannot read a Class 2 local language story.

Numeracy

  • 3 out of 10 children in P3 can solve a Class 2 division problem. In the same class, almost 1 out of 5 children cannot recognize numbers between 10 and 99.
  • By the time children reach P7, 15 in 100 still cannot solve Class 2 division.

These findings, released today by Uwezo at Twaweza, are from the sixth national learning assessment conducted in September to October 2015. Uwezo partners assessed over 94,000 children, aged 6 to 16, from all 112 districts in the country. Data were collected from more than 3,000 schools and 65,000 households. The report, Are Our Children Learning (2016)?, provides new insights into the current status of learning in Uganda’s schools and areas of focus to improve learning outcomes.

Although learning outcomes are poor across the country, there are stark inequalities between groups and locations. Household, school and locational factors seem to have the most effect on learning.

At the household level, socioeconomic status, assessed through considering the kind of assets owned by households, appears to have a consistent and significant effect on learning outcomes. P3 to P7 pupils who come from households with higher amounts of possessions seem to have an advantage over their peers of 4 percentage points in English, 2 percentage points in local language literacy and 4 percentage points in numeracy.

At school level, learning outcomes seem to be connected to pre-primary attendance, type of school and whether the pupil received privately paid remedial classes.

  • Pre-primary: For P3 to P7 students, having two or more years of pre-primary experience boosts English competence by 15 percentage points, local language competence by 13 percentage points and numeracy by seven percentage points.
  • Private school: For P3 to P7 students, attending private schools boosts their competence over their government school peers by 17 percentage points in English, 10 percentage points in mathematics and six percentage points in local languages.
  • Privately paid remedial classes: For P3 to P7 students, attending privately paid remedial classes increases basic literacy and numeracy skills, English by 18 percentage points, local languages by 14 percentage points and numeracy by 10 percentage points.

continue reading ...

2015 Kenya Annual Learning Assessment Report Published

15 December, 2016, Nairobi: In its sixth year of assessing children’s basic literacy and numeracy skills, Uwezo continues to find that children are not learning as they should be. On average, 30 out of 100 Class 3 pupils can do Class 2 work, while 8 out of 100 pupils in Class 8 cannot.

In addition, the Uwezo data highlight some critical issues in terms of teacher distribution. Teachers are critical to learning and the recent findings confirm that lower pupil-teacher ratios have a strong effect on learning.

The teacher/classroom (stream) ratio is low. On average, there were 12 teachers for every school with 10 classrooms (streams).

This ratio declines when only Teachers Service Commission (TSC) teachers are accounted for to 11 TSC teachers for every school with 10 classrooms (streams).

Counties with the best teacher (TSC teachers) to classroom (stream) ratio (12 teachers for 10 classrooms/streams) were Kirinyaga, Kiambu, Embu, Nakuru, Nairobi, Kisii and Baringo.

Counties with the worst teacher (TSC teachers) to classroom (stream) ratio (6 teachers for 10 classrooms/streams) were Mandera and Garissa.

On average, 12 out of 100 teachers were absent from school on the day of the visit. This is worse than was reported in 2014 where there were 9 out of 100 teachers absent on the day of visit.

The Uwezo data also highlight challenges in regards to the implementation of policies around early childhood education (pre-primary).

Only 4 out of 10 pre-primary teachers are trained.

3 out of 10 children are in primary school at the wrong age; 13% are aged 2-3 years while 21% are aged 6 or over.

Half of pre-primary teachers (46%) are hired by county governments despite the lack of a clear policy on who is responsible for hiring these teachers.

These findings, released today by Uwezo at Twaweza, are from the sixth national learning assessment conducted between October and November 2015. Uwezo partners tested over 130,000 children, aged 6 to 16, from all 47 counties in the country. Data were collected from more than 4,500 schools and 69,000 households. The report, Are Our Children Learning?, examines three interconnected challenges in education: learning outcomes and what drives them, teachers and access to pre-primary, and primary education.

continue reading ...

2014 Uganda Annual Learning Assessment Report Published

1 June, 2016, Kampala: Despite marked progress in increasing access to education in recent years, Uganda has not fully met its commitments under the Education for All Goals. And the improved national average figures conceal stark contrasts between the different districts and wealth classes of Uganda. In addition, there has been an intensive policy and resource focus on primary education at the expense of early childhood development, adult literacy and vocational and other training for young people. Even in primary education, the high investment has not translated into learning outcomes; too many children in Primary 3 to 7 are unable to complete Primary 2 level work.

These were the main findings of the 2014 Uganda Annual Learning Assessment, released in a report by Uwezo at Twaweza entitled Are our children learning? Five Stories on the State of Education in Uganda in 2015 and beyondThe report is based on data collected by Uwezo, a citizen-led assessment of learning outcomes in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. This report is based on data from the fifth Uwezo assessment that was carried out in 2014 and a review of available evidence. The data were collected from a nationally representative sample of 28 districts in Uganda.

The findings of this fifth Uwezo report are clustered around the six Education for All (EFA) Goals and focus on: early childhood education (EFA Goal 1 on early childhood care and education), access to, and progression through, primary school (EFA Goal 2 on access to and completion of primary education for all), youth and mothers’ literacy as well as vocational and business training opportunities (EFA Goals 3 and 4 on adult literacy and lifelong learning), inequalities including gender (EFA Goal 5 on gender and other inequalities) and learning outcomes (EFA Goal 6 on the quality of education).

continue reading ...

2014 Kenya Annual Learning Assessment Report published

26 May 2016, Nairobi: Despite marked progress in increasing access to education across Kenya in recent years, Kenya has not fully met its commitments under the Education for All Goals. And the improved national average figures conceal stark contrasts between the different regions of Kenya. Children in North Eastern region are much more likely to face challenges in access to school, school readiness and learning outcomes.

These were the main findings of the 2014 Kenya Annual Learning Assessment Report, released by Uwezo at Twaweza in a report entitled Are our children learning? The state of education in Kenya in 2015 and beyond. The report is based on data collected by Uwezo, a citizen-led assessment of learning outcomes in Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. In this report data from all five Uwezo assessments are used, meaning data points were collected from over 600,000 children drawn from all the counties in Kenya.

The findings of this fifth Uwezo report are clustered around the six Education for All Goals and focus on: early childhood education and school readiness (EFA Goal 1 on early childhood care and education), access to, and progression through, primary school (EFA Goal 2 on access to and completion of primary education for all), adult school attendance and mothers’ literacy (EFA Goals 3 and 4 on adult literacy and lifelong learning), inequalities including gender (EFA Goal 5 on gender and other inequalities) and learning outcomes (EFA Goal 6 on the quality of education).

 

continue reading ...

WE WANT YOUR STORIES!

December 11th 2014
Uwezo Kenya and Uwezo Uganda

STORIES OF CHANGE LONG PICTURE

Over the past five years, we have heard lots of stories about ordinary people doing great things in their communities to improve the quality of education. Are you one of these people? Or do you know someone who is doing something really innovative, exciting and interesting in education?

We want to hear from you!

Uwezo Kenya and Uwezo Uganda are running a new project, called ‘Stories of Change’. We will be travelling all over Kenya and Uganda for the next three months, meeting and interviewing ordinary citizens who are making change in their own communities.

Collecting these stories leads to the heart of what Uwezo is about: improving our understanding of how citizen-led change happens and helping us understand the successful pathways of change people have chosen.

We want to celebrate and congratulate citizens who aren’t just sitting around waiting for someone else to make a difference in improving the quality of education, they are taking the actions themselves!

Please get in touch with us if you are, or know of anyone, who is taking actions to improve the quality of education in their area.

In Kenya – please contact:

Teresa Kimani, on +254 720 547 276, or Tewaki@yahoo.com

In Uganda – please contact:

Jocelyn Amongin, on +256 781 630 601, or Amonginjb@gmail.com

We look forward to hearing from you!

continue reading ...

Page 1 of 4212345...102030...Last »