TANZANIA: 50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE: IS EDUCATION FOR SELF-RELIANCE RELEVANT IN TANZANIA TODAY?

26 September 2011
IPPmedia

Our educational system has to encourage, foster and prepare our young people to play a dynamic and constructive part in the development of a society in which all members share fairly in the good or bad fortune of the group, and in which progress is measured in terms of human well-being, not prestige in the form of buildings, cars, or other such things, whether privately or publicly owned. Our education must therefore inculcate a sense of commitment to the total community, and help the pupils to accept the values appropriate to our kind of future, not those appropriate to our colonial past.

Last year, I was involved in the Education Sector Review, which is done annually by the Ministry of Education and Vocation Training in collaboration with various education stakeholders such as Civil Societies Organisations, Development Partners and others. The aim of the Review was to find out the implementation status of policies in relation to quality, management and governance and cross cutting issues; and to track the sources of funds and its expenditure. Click here to read more…

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TANZANIA: MASSIVE DECLINE IN ENGLISH COMPETENCIES

25 September 2011
IPPmedia

In one of a local TV advert, a teacher asks a student to define global warming. Biting her finger and thinking really hard, the student struggles to find the right English words to explain the terminology. After struggling for some time, the student decides to explain the terminology in Kiswahili and the teacher cuts her short insisting she does so in English. The student keeps quiet and appears to think hard as she again tries to figure out the right English words.

In the meantime, the rest of the class remains silent as no one can give the definition in English. Finally, the teacher, smilingly, allows the student to define the terminology in Kiswahili. Relieved, the student smiles and defines the term ‘global warming,’ more confidently. Click here to read more…

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TANZANIA: ARE OUR CHILDREN LEARNING?

23 September 2011
Daily News

ARE our children learning? Apparently not, according to the findings of an extensive research carried out by Uwezo II team, led by Prof. Suleman Sumra. The report was launched on September 15th at the Tanzania Institute of Education in Dar es Salaam. Researchers and volunteers in Tanzania interviewed 128,000 pupils spread over 3,850 villages in 132 districts. This was the second of a four year effort, supported by the Hewett Foundation, SIDA, the World Bank, DfID/ACT, Open Society Institute and Twaweza. Similar exercises are being carried out concurrently in Kenya and Uganda.

This citizens’ initiative holds up a mirror to the realities of our education system, and goes to the heart of schooling by asking, “Are our children learning?” Uwezo uses Standard II syllabus to test children aged 7-16 for their competence in basic literacy in Swahili and English, and in basic numeracy. What is mirrored back tells us that we should never presume. Click here to read more…

 

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TANZANIA: MORE RESOUCES REQUIRED TO PUT IN PLACE FUNCTIONAL EDUCATION

22 September 2011

 
IPPmedia

 

 

On Thursday, September 15, 2011 education stakeholders and journalists gathered at the Institute of Education in Dar es Salaam to witness the launch of the 2nd Annual Assessment Report Tanzania 2011 by Uwezo Tanzania, an organisation which provides a mirror on the working of the national educational systems in the East African region.

 

Uwezo’s 2nd Annual Assessment Report was done by volunteers in 132 district of Tanzania through assessing 128,000 pupils in Kiswahili, English and Arithmetic. The survey targeted Standard II pupils to understand their proficiency in those subjects. The fundamental question in this ambitious project was whether or not Tanzanian children are accessing their constitutional right to quality basic education. Click here to read more….

 

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UGANDA: 50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE: ARE OUR CHILDREN LEARNING?

20 September 2011
IPPmedia

In the last two articles I have tried to provide a reminisce of the education delivery in Tanzania since independence. Today, we need to ask ourselves: “What is our education system intended to do? What is its purpose? What kind of society are we trying to build?”

I would like to share with you a very powerful speech by Zitto Kabwe (MP), delivered at the launch of Uwezo Annual Learning Assessment Report on the September 15, this year. The following is his speech: “Are our children learning?” is now a catch question since the launch of the East African annual learning assessment report in the middle of 2011. Now we are launching a country report reflecting national data. Being asked to speak at the launch of this report was a bit of a challenge to me as I started to ask myself questions and try to remember my childhood. Was I learning when I was in Kigoma Primary School? Click here to read more…

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